Destination
Myanmar

Why Myanmar?

Myanmar is the perfect example of a trip that isn’t simply a holiday or a reward, but a deeply satisfying and life-changing experience. The “Golden Land” truly lives up to its name, with gilded spires dotting the skyline of the capital, Yangon, and beaming smiles meeting you at every corner. Myanmar can offer travelers not just unforgettable memories of incredible temples and exciting boat races, but a true sense of spirit as this diverse people welcomes you all into an entirely new, culturally-rich world.

Myanmar NAYPYIDAW INLE HALIN MONYWA MANDALAY BAGAN BEIKTHANO LOIKAW NGAPALI SRI KSETRA GOLDEN ROCK NGWE SAUNG YANGON HPA AN MAW LAMYINE DAWEI MYEIK MERGUI ARCHIPELAGO KAWTHAUNG

Mount Kyaiktiyo (Golden Rock)

Mount Kyaiktiyo (Kyite Htee Yoe), famous for the huge golden rock perched at its summit, is one of the three most sacred religious sites in Myanmar, along with the Shwedagon Pagoda and the Mahamuni Temple. Pilgrims come here from far and wide to worship and add gold leaf to the rock, which seems to defy gravity by delicately balancing on the edge of the 1100-metre high mountain.

For many visitors, the rock (standing 7.6 metres tall) and the gilded pagoda which sits on top of it (itself 7.3 metres tall), which are said to cover a hair of the Buddha, are the main draw, but another reason to make the journey are the panoramic 360 degree views of the surrounding Mon State mountains from the summit.

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Best time to visit
November to March
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Family Travel, Art & Culture
Suggest activities
Hiking, pilgrimage
Transportation
By car, train

Beikthano

Ancient sites in Myanmar are generally associated with fabulous traditions and folklore handed down from generation to generation since ages past. Beikthano is not an exception. It is traditionally believed to have been founded some 2,400 years ago by Princess Panhtwar descended from a still legendary dynasty of Tagaung in Upper Myanmar. The fall of the city is attributed to a mightier king, Duttabaung of Sri Ksetra, who sacked the city, subdued the princess, took her captive and eventually married her. In the present stage of historical research in this country the personalities characterized in the legend are beyond authentic identification. However, the existence of an ancient city called Beikthano (Vishnu City) is testified by the ruins which stand to this day and indicates that the legend may have sprung up from a nucleus of true facts.

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Best time to visit
October to March
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel, Sustainable
Transportation
By car
Suggest activities
Sightseeing

Kawthaung

Burma’s long, thin Tanintharyi Region stretches south down the Andaman coast and eventually narrows to a sharp point. At the very tip of this point, just shy of 1,200 kilometres south of Yangon, you’ll find the small port, border crossing, administrative centre and market town of Kawthaung which is also the most southerly limit of Burma. Moreover, Despite its waterside setting, Kawthaung itself is not a particularly beautiful town – but it is an interesting and culturally varied place to wander around, with strong Indian and Muslim influences. As is customary for Myanmar towns of this size, Kawthaung is home to hilltop pagodas offering good views of the sea and surrounding area; the Pyi Daw Aye Pagoda is close to the centre of town and has market stalls at it entrances.

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Best time to visit
June to August
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel, Honeymoon, Beach Stay
Transportation
By car
Suggest activities
Sightseeing, explore nature, fishing

Myeik

Myeik (formerly Mergui) is a fascinating town located along Tanintharyi region’s Andaman coastline. The least visited of Burma’s southern destinations, it’s a town of interesting contrasts and one that is likely to change enormously in the coming years. The town boasts a sprinkling of isles on its horizon while the town itself is geographically up and down and round and round. It’s home to fantastic old colonial period architecture, yet displays a building boom the likes of which we haven’t seen elsewhere south of Yangon.

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Best time to visit
Late November to mid March.
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel, Honeymoon, Beach Stay
Transportation
By car, boat, airway
Suggest activities
Sightseeing, explore nature, water sports

Dawei

Dawei (Tavoy) is the capital of Tanintharyi Division, in Southeastern Myanmar. As this area has been closed for tourism until early 2013, it is largely undeveloped and unexplored and makes for a very authentic and rewarding experience. With a magnificent, largely untouched coastline, jungle interior and a sprinkling of islands, Burma’s Dawei region more than anywhere else along this coastline has enormous potential for explore.

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Best time to visit
November to February
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel, Honeymoon, Beach Stay
Transportation
By car
Suggest activities
Sightseeing, explore nature

Sri Ksetra

Sri Ksetra (Thayekhittaya in Myanmar), one of the ancient Pyu capitals of Myanmar, lies five miles south-east of Pyay on the left bank of the Ayeyarwady and about 180 miles north-west of Yangon. The founding of the city is popularly attributed to the reign of Duttabaung as early as the 101 st year of religion, that is, some two thousand four hundred years ago. The 1,500-year-old stupas and temples of Sri-Ksetra are among the earliest Buddhist monuments in the world. Built of brick, the stupas of Bawbawgyi and Phaya-mar and temples of Lemyet-nhar and Bebe were also among the first structures to employ a vaulted arch system, which later became prevalent in Myanmar and throughout Southeast Asia. Added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2014, the site is centred on the remains of the royal palace and, although not much remains of the original city, there are a number of tombs, palaces, pagodas and other religious sites to explore – including the huge, cylindrical, brick-built Baw Baw Gyi Pagoda, said to be the oldest Buddhist monument in Myanmar; the Rahanta Cave Pagoda; the Lay Myet Hna monument; and the royal cemetery.

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Best time to visit
All year round
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel, Sustainable
Transportation
By motorbike, car
Suggest activities
Sightseeing, explore nature, explore culture

Capital: Naypyidaw

Absurdly grandiose in scale, Naypyidaw (one translation is ‘Royal City of the Sun’) is a sprawling, shoddily constructed city with eight-lane highways, 24-hour electricity, and zones for shopping, government housing and hotels, ministry buildings and generals’ homes. Apart from the roadblocks that protect the roads leading to the generals’ mansions, ministry buildings and the parliament, it’s surprisingly open. Visits to some of its sights, including a giant gilded pagoda, allow you to mingle freely with locals while putting a dollar or two into the private economy. This aside, it can feel soulless – Canberra meets Brasilia with a peculiar Orwellian twist.

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Best time to visit
December to February
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel, Honeymoon
Transportation
By motorbike, car, airway
Nearest Airport
Nay Pyi Taw International Airport

Halin

An almost imperceptible rise means that the attractive village of Hanlin (Halingyi, Halin, Halim) sits very slightly above the pan-flat surrounding plains. For centuries this geographical advantage was deeply significant and the site was home to a large city over 1600 years ago. Moreover, Hanlin village is a magical place in its own right. Unpaved ox-cart tracks link an incredible plethora of decaying old stupas that create the feeling of an untouched mini-Bagan. It’s best appreciated when the area is viewed from behind Maung San Monastery with its obvious golden zedi.

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Best time to visit
October to December
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel, Sustainable
Transportation
By motorbike, car
Suggest activities
Sightseeing, explore nature

Inle Lake

“Mystical,” “magical,” and “outrageously beautiful” are but some of the words used to describe the azure Inle Lake, nestled amidst the mist-shrouded Southern Shan plateau. The Inthar tribe, who populate this dramatic area, have built their houses over the water on stilts, and have a most diverse, aquatic economy. The area around Inle Lake is dotted with fabulous architectural and archaeological delights, as well. Ancient Buddhist monasteries abound, and the remarkable ruins of the villages of Sagar and Indian are not to be missed. However, the real jewel in the crown is the holiest of shrines in the Southern Shan State: the Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda. And with the vibrant, colorful, and truly exciting market, selling anything from fresh produce to souvenirs, you will never be bored here!

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Best time to visit
All year round
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Art & Culture, Wellness
Suggest itinerary

Golden Bliss in Myanmar

Culture and Traditions in the Golden Land

Easia Companions

Sofitel Inle

Novotel Inle

Lashio

Lashio was famous in World War II as the starting point for the Burma Road. Capital of the northern Shan State, this major settlement is both Shan and Chinese-influenced, being extremely close to the Yunan province of China. The two major, local attractions are a train ride across the dramatic Gokehtaik viaduct, which offers some of the most astonishing panoramic scenery anywhere in the world, and a visit to the nearby hot spa – popular with local pilgrims, who believe that bathing in the warm waters will purify them in both body and mind.

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Best time to visit
November to March
Travel Types
Classic
Suggest activities
Hiking, sightseeing
Transportation
By car

Kalaw

The charming hill station of Kalaw sits on the western edge of the Shan plateau, at an altitude of approximately 1350 meters, and was established by the British as a summer resort. The locals’ living quarters are located in the valley, whereas the delightful colonial buildings can be seen on a circular road in the hills that rings the town. Moreover, Kalaw is also known as Myanmar’s trekking paradise. Whether you are after a brief stroll just to soak up the atmosphere or explore further and take in some hill glimpses and the colourful flower-lined streets, Kalaw offers a wide variety of options for discovery – and a freedom of unfettered movement that is not always possible in other, more remote parts of Myanmar.

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Best time to visit
July to January
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel, Wellness
Suggest itinerary

Culture and Traditions in the Golden Land, Spiritual awakening in the Golden Land

Transportation
By car

Pindaya

Pindaya is a small town and home to the Danu minority people. It is located in a fertile valley, bordered to the West by a 1700-meter-high mountain range, and is rightly famed for its magnificent caves. The drive to Pindaya is incredibly scenic, whether you come from Inle Lake, Kalaw, Mandalay, or Bagan. Soak in the beauty of multi-coloured fields, tribal villages, buffalo cowboys, bamboo hat makers, orange farms, and bullock carts loaded with cabbages this region has to offer.

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Best time to visit
November to April
Travel Types
Classic
Suggest itinerary

Highlights of Myanmar

Easia Companions

Conqueror Resort Hotel

Bhamo (Banmaw)

Bhamo is an old trading port town, situated in Kachin State, on the banks of the Irrawaddy River. The Chinese border is only 80 kilometers away, and the infamous Ledo-Burma Road, which was built by the Americans during World War II, passes right by the town. About 3 kilometers north of Bhamo lie the remnants of the 15th century Shan Kingdom of Sampanago, its ruined pagodas and overgrown, city walls slowly being swallowed by the trees.

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Best time to visit
November to February
Travel Types
Classic
Suggest activities
Explore the landmarks, biking
Nearest Transportation
Bhamo Banmaw Airport

Putao

In a remote part of northern Myanmar, surrounded by some of Southeast Asia’s highest, ice-capped peaks of the Himalayan Range, lies the peaceful town of Puta O. This is the northernmost town of any significant size in Myanmar, and thus the gateway to unique, frontier explorations into the ecologically-rich forests and snow-capped mountains that separate Myanmar from India’s Arunachal Pradesh.

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Best time to visit
November to April
Travel Types
Classic, Wellness
Suggest activities
Trekking, mountaineering, exploring local life
Nearest Transportation
Putao Airport

Mogok

Mogok offers a break from the cultural and religious sites of Myanmar by offering much different, authentic, interactive experiences. In addition, the town is just 200 kilometers north of Mandalay, but with so few tourists, making it an easy, off-the-beaten track addition to a classic itinerary. Long closed to foreigners, the ruby-mining town of Mogok is now open to explorers and travelers. Around 90% of the world’s rubies originate in Myanmar, with Mogok and the surrounding area acting as a key hub of the ruby trade.

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Best time to visit
October to March
Travel Types
Classic
Transportation
By Boat
Nearest Transportation
Mandalay International Airport

Nyaung Shwe

The old Shan Palace (which was the residence of the first president of Burma) houses so much of historical interest, including a genuine royal throne, as well as numerous, incredible photographs of the royal period. The town’s Ratanar Maung Aung temple is also not to be missed, with its wonderful collection of religious antiques. This town offers good value accommodation, and is a great place to start a bicycle tour around the lake or its surrounding villages.

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Best time to visit
November to March
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Family Travel, Art & Culture
Suggest itineraries

Nyaung Shwe morning cycling ride

Transportation
By Train, Car

Mount Popa

Mount Popa can be simply described as the “Mount Olympus” of Myanmar. Located 48 kilometers southeast of Bagan, the road to Mount Popa passes several Burmese villages amongst toddy palms and farms of peanuts, corn, sesame, and grapes. Be sure to stop and chat with the locals, and you will surely be rewarded with an opportunity to sample the local alcoholic spirit, distilled from palm sugar!

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Best time to visit
October to March
Travel Types
Classic, Wellness
Suggest itineraries

Explore beautiful Myanmar by bike 12 Days/ 11 Nights

Transportation
By car

Mandalay

With a population of approximately 1.2 million people, Mandalay – located 700 kilometers north of Yangon – is Myanmar’s second largest city, and as a result of its proximity to China and a trade route with India, is the country’s main commercial hub. The Hill, its slopes studded with pagodas, still looms large over the city. Throughout history, Mandalay was bombed flat in WWII and the palace disappeared, along with so much more irreplaceable history. The palace was rebuilt in the 1990s, and since then, Mandalay has undergone a massive construction boom that places less emphasis on aesthetics and more on growth. An increasing number of motorbikes and cars clog the roads, too, making for a sometimes smoggy city.

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Best time to visit
October to March
Travel Types
Classic, Art & Culture
Suggest itineraries

Golden Bliss in Myanmar

Highlights of Myanmar

Easia Companions

Hotel Yadanarbon

Hotel Magic

Mingun

Mingun is a sizable Burmese village on the western bank of the Ayarwaddy River, 11 kilometers north of Mandalay, and can be reached by an extremely pleasant, 90-minute boat ride along the Irrawaddy River. Although it has never been a ‘royal city,’ Mingun has much to offer, with its bustling port and fascinating historical sights. Besides, Mingun would have become the home of the world’s largest religious monument – if it had been completed! This signature, unmissable destination in Mingun is ehe Mingun Pahtodawgyi, the remains of a massive construction project begun by King Bodawpaya in 1790, which was intentionally left unfinished, when the King passed away.

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Best time to visit
November to December
Travel Types
Classic
Suggest activities
Sightseeing, exploring culture
Transportation
By boat, ferry

Yangon

Yangon, the capital of Myanmar, is quite verdant and cool, with lush tropical trees, shady parks, and beautiful lakes, earning it the title of “The Garden City of the East.” At the same time, it also exudes an atmosphere of a typical, bustling Asian city.

As the main arrival point to the country by both sea and air, it is very much Myanmar’s hub of both commercial and administrative activities, as well as the country’s main center of learning, hosting numerous educational institutions. On the other hand, in many ways, Yangon (formerly known as Rangoon) still retains its signature culture and beauty.

The city remains focused around the Shwedagon Paya, an inspiring, golden Buddhist monument, around which everything else in the city revolves. Quite close to it are the parks and lakes that provide Yangonites with an escape from the surrounding bustle and a bit of natural peace.

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Best time to visit
All year round
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Family Travel, Art & Culture, Gastronomy
Suggest itineraries

Golden Bliss in Myanmar

Highlights of Myanmar

Easia Companions

Sule Shangri la Hotel

Chatrium Hotel

Hpa An

Hpa-An is a small town, but a busy center of commerce, with its bustling “farmers markets.” The population is largely made up of the Kayin and Burmese people, and the town’s most distinguishing feature is the limestone pinnacle forming the Zwegabin Mountain, which provides a dramatic backdrop for the entire town. Beyond this, endeavor to experience the local life; hike, visit world’s biggest lying Buddha, or simply wander the beautiful, lush rice fields.

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Best time to visit
October to April
Travel Types
Classic
Suggest activities
Cycling, exploring nature, sightseeing, hiking
Easia Companions

Keinnara Hpa An

Northern Chin State

The Northern Chin State – near the border with India – is rugged and remote, with long distances between villages. This is a region for taking a true ‘journey,’ rather than seeking a specific destination. The scenery is stunning, and the small villages offer lots of opportunities for genuine interaction with locals. Even though the tourist infrastructure remains undeveloped, the area offers travelers authentic, adventurous and memorable experiences.

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Best time to visit
November to March
Travel Types
Art & Culture, Wellness
Transportation
By car, Airway
Nearest Airport
Kyaukhtu Airport

Pyin Oo Lwin

Pyin Oo Lwin – originally a Shan-Danu village – was occupied by the British in 1885, who transformed the village and renamed it Maymyo, or “The City of May,” so named for a British officer of the same name, stationed here to deal with a Burmese uprising. In 1896, the city became a hill station for the European civil servants based in Mandalay to retreat to during the hottest months, from March through May, and there are a number of Edwardian style cottages still standing as a monument to the occupation.

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Best time to visit
December to January
Travel Types
Classic
Suggest activities

A day out in Pyin Oo Lwin Country Side

Transportation
By car, motobike

Loikaw

Traveling to Loikaw is as much about the journey as it is about the destination, itself – the locale is best reached by a combination of boat and car. The boat trip goes to the remote, southern ends of Inle Lake, stopping in the town of Sagar, far away from tourists. On the return journey, the overland trip passes through scenic Shan Hills, with no signs of tourism development and several hill tribe villages, making it a fantastically authentic experience.

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Best time to visit
generally, the mid-year months
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel
Easia Companions

Kennari Loikaw Hotel

Nearest Airport
Loikaw Airport

Sagaing

Although Sagaing is the capital of the largest province in Myanmar, it seems to be a sleepy, quiet, and untouched place. This is largely due to its proximity to the fabulous city of Mandalay, a mere 25 kilometers away, where most of the businesses in the region have chosen to make their base. This charming, friendly town is a major monastic center, and a somewhat serene escape from Mandalay’s constant buzz. A highlight is walking the sometimes steep, covered stairways that take you past monasteries and nunneries to vistas, from which you can survey the river and a stunning landscape of emerald hills and stupas.

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Best time to visit
November to February
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel
Suggest activities
By car, ferry
Nearest Airport
Mandalay International Airport

Ngapali

Ngapali Beach is probably the best-known resort in Myanmar. It is located in Rakhine State, in western Myanmar, close to the ancient city of Thandwe on the Bay of Bengal. The white sandy beach stretches for around 11 kilometers ,fringed by swaying coconut palms, and boasts cobalt-blue waters. On the other hand, Ngapali maintains a laid-back, fishing village vibe, as evidenced by the small boats that head out nightly to catch the bounty that is served up to visitors just hours later.

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Best time to visit
October to April
Travel Types
Honeymoon, Family Travel, Beach Stay, Wellness
Transportation
By car, airway, boat
Easia Companions

Ngapali Bay

Pristine Mermaid

Monywa

Monywa is a city in Sagaing Division, Northern Myanmar. Although by no means one of the most-visited towns, Monywa still has much to offer. The area is a thriving place, with an agricultural and industrialized foodstuff-based economy. It has a significant, commercially strategic location, serving as the gateway to the entire western Chindwin and Irrawaddy Rivers, and even provides access to India across the Chin Hills.

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Best time to visit
October to May
Travel Types
Classic
Transportation
By car, ferry
Nearest Airport
Monyaw Airport

Mergui Archipelagos

The islands offer an extraordinary array of blue and turquoise coral gardens, rare and endangered bird species, silver-white beaches, glass-clear waters, and rich marine wildlife. This magnificent and largely unspoiled area is ideal for anybody wanting to escape the ‘real world’ as – despite its astonishing natural beauty – tourist options are currently remarkably limited. The only two ways to visit the area are either a stay at the Myanmar Andaman Resort or (for the more adventurous) to explore the islands by boat.

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Best time to visit
October to March
Travel Types
Honeymoon, Beach Stay, Family Travel, Sustainable
Transportation
By boat
Suggest activities

From Temples to Turquoise Waters

Ngwe Saung

In 2000, Ngwe Saung became Myanmar’s newest beach holiday destination. Literally, the name means “Silver Beach,” and the 14.5 kilometer-long beach, facing the Bay of Bengal, has an unspoiled natural beauty with a very attractive white sandy beach, gently sloping down to the clear blue waters. Dividing the northern and southern parts of the 13 miles of beach here is Ngwe Saung Village, where there’s a constantly-growing selection of decent restaurants. Given Ngwe Saung’s relative proximity to Yangon – a six-hour bus ride away – this is perhaps the best place in Myanmar for a beach getaway that won’t break the bank.

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Best time to visit
October to April
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Family Travel, Beach stay
Transportation
By car, motobike
Easia Companions

Eskala Hotel and Resorts

Mrauk U

Lying on a rocky, isolated plateau in western Myanmar, Mrauk U is one of most the spectacular royal cites in all of Asia. King Min Saw Mon laid the foundation stones of the great city in 1433 CE. The golden age of its 350-year history came under the leadership of King Razagyi, following his conquest of the powerful kingdom of Bago in the early 17th century, and lasted until the death of King Bodawpaya in 1784. In its heyday, Mrauk U served as a free port for trading with the Middle East, Portugal, Spain, and Holland.

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Best time to visit
October to mid-May
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Wellness
Transportation
By car, boat
Suggest activities
Explore the landmarks and culture

Ancient Capitals (Amarapura, Ava and Sagaing)

In Myanmar, you can embark on an expedition to investigate the ancient capitals of Amarapura, Ava and Sagaing, crossing the bridge over the Irrawaddy River into Sagaing. With 600 ivory-colored pagodas and monasteries, Sagaing Hill is generally seen as the spiritual hub of Myanmar, and claims residence to around 3,000 monks and nearly 100 meditation shrines. Continuing through Sagaing’s local market, a less visited tourist site, you can reach Ava, which was the standing capital from the 14th through the 18th centuries.

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Best time to visit
November to February
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Family Travel, Art & Culture
Transportation
By boat
Suggest activities
Exploring ancient ruins

Kyaikhtiyo (Golden Rock)

Known as ‘the Golden Rock,’ the Kyaikhtiyo Pagoda is one of the most magical destinations in Myanmar. For both Buddhist pilgrims and tourists alike, it is very much a ‘must-visit place’. The history of the pagoda is legendary, as no official record of its past exists. The Buddhists believe that it was built during the lifetime of Buddha himself – nearly 2,500 years ago. Your guide will doubtlessly regale you with this, and many other equally dramatic tales!

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Best time to visit
October to May
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Wellness
Transportation
By car
Suggest activities
Explore the landmarks and culture

Mawlamyaing

Located 165 kilometers from Yangon, at the mouth of the Thanlwin River and across the Gulf of Mottama, Mawlamyaing is the third largest city in Myanmar after Yangon and Mandalay. It is a town full of charm, with many buildings of colonial style architecture. The main attraction to see is the Thanlwin Bridge, which stretches a distance of 11,000 feet over the Thanlwin River (and is the longest road and rail bridge in Myanmar), connecting the country’s southeastern region with its capital, Yangon.

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Best time to visit
October to May
Travel Types
Classic, Family Travel
Nearest Airport
Maylamyine Airport
Suggest activities
Explore the landmarks

Bagan

Bagan is, in many ways, one of the most remarkable religious cities in the world. Although historically, Bagan’s glory days may be over, what remains are incredible temple ruins, making it one of the most amazing sites in Myanmar, and a genuine wonder of the world. There is much to be enjoyed in Bagan, whether you choose the comfort of a drive around the thousands of ruins by car or prefer to explore in a more leisurely fashion using either a horse drawn cart or bicycle.

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Best time to visit
July to March
Travel Types
Classic, Honeymoon, Family Travel, Art & Culture,Sustainable, Wellness
Easia Companions

Shwe Yee pwint Hotel

Amata Garden Resort

Suggest activities

Golden Bliss in Myanmar

Highlights of Myanmar

Quick facts

Neighboring Countries: bordered on the north-east by China, on the east by Laos and Thailand, on the south-west by the Andaman Sea and the Bay of Bengal and on the north-west by Bangladesh and India.

Area: 676,578 km²

Population (2018): 53.37 millions

Capital: Nay Pyi Daw

Religion: Buddhist (87.9%), Christian (6.2%), Muslim (4.3%), Hindu (0.5%), Animist (0.8%) and others (0.2%)

Language: Burmese

Currency: Myanmar Kyat (1US$ = 1509.19 Kyat, March 2019).

At present the following kyat banknotes were in use: K 50, K 100, K 500 and K 1000. A sum of 100,000 is called “thein” in Burmese, so K 100,000 is thein kyat.

Visa & travel permissions

Tourist Visa arranged from your home country

For the vast majority of travellers to Myanmar, the easiest visa to obtain is a tourist visa. A tourist visa can be applied directly at the Myanmar Embassy of your home country. A tourist visa costs around 50 USD (depending on your home country). Travellers will be required to submit the following when applying for a visa:

E-visa service

The electronic visa system is the most efficient way to obtain a 28-day tourist visa. The process takes 3 business days and costs 50 USD which must be paid in advance by credit or debit card. It is currently (as of January 2015) available for citizens of 100 countries but more countries are being added on a regular basis. The visa is valid for arrival at Yangon International Airport, Mandalay International Airport and Nay Pyi Taw International Airport.

From 01/09/2016, E-Visa can be used to enter Myanmar from the following three land border checkpoints, between Myanmar and Thailand:

– Tachileik

– Myawaddy

– Kawthaung

– Htee Khee

– Tamu

The application process and policies remain the same, and is applicable to both tourist and business E-Visa types. However, except from the mentioned entrances above, the entrance will be not valid for others land border with an e-visa.

Please be aware of the following information for any visa application:

– Your passport needs to be valid for at least 6 months at the time of departure from Myanmar

– You must provide a photograph (4cmx6cm) taken within 3 months from the date of the visa application and the return airline ticket

– The maximum stay in Myanmar is 28 days

– The application fee of 50 USD per person can be paid by credit card (Visa, Master) and will not be refunded if visa application is rejected

– A confirmation email will be sent to you within one hour after submitting your application

– The average processing time for each application is 5 days

– The e-visa is valid for a period of 90 days after the date of issue.

Since 01st April 2018, a new “tourist express visa” has been operating. With this new service, you can apply for a regular Tourist Visa using expedited application processing, 365 days a year, with results e-mailed within 24 hours (including public holidays). The cost of this service is $56, and is available to all applicants currently eligible for a regular Tourist Visa. Note that Express Service is not available for Business Visa.

Extensions & Overstaying your visa 

Travelers to Myanmar are not permitted to extend their tourist visas, but overstaying is a possible option for those who may exceed their 28 days within the Union. A fine of $3 per day plus a $3 “registration fee” is charged. There is no exact regulation, but travelers should not exceed this by over two weeks. Overstayers are advised to have exact change ready at the immigration department at the airport (as they are not likely to change $100 bills and they won’t take Kyat). Note, overstaying your visa may lead to difficulties with airport immigration if you’re planning domestic flights, particularly in far-flung airports (like Sittwe or Myitkyina). It’s wise to stick with land routes.

Passports

All visitors to Myanmar are required to carry a valid passport and a Myanmar visa. The passports must be valid for six months beyond the intended stay.

Travel permissions

Several regions in Myanmar require special permission for travel. In order to secure this approval we may ask for a scanned copy of your passport in advance. For specific areas, we need this scanned copy at least 3-4 weeks in advance in order to assure the paperwork completion.

From time to time, due to varying issues, places are closed without prior notice. In this case we will do our best to propose and alternate plan after consulting with the clients.

Best time to visit

Access & Transportation

Travel to Myanmar

By Air

Direct flights to Myanmar are relatively difficult to find. However, many travelers from all corners of the globe can still generally fly to Yangon or Mandalay with one stop. The country is home to three international airports situated at Yangon, Mandalay and Nay Pyi Taw, the last one operating mostly regional flights.

By Land

Fees for the border crossing sometimes apply and special permissions by the ministry of tourism and immigration are needed for most borders.

Four border entry/exit points along Myanmar-Thai border have been upgraded to International Gateways and one entry/exit point along the Myanmar-India border officially opened in August 2018 ; meaning that all travelers with valid visa/electronic visa are allowed to enter or leave the country via below border towns:

(a) Tachilek – Maisai (Thailand);

(b) Myawaddy – Mesok (Thailand);

(c) Htee Kee – Phunaron (Thailand);

(d) Kawthoung – Ranong (Thailand); and

( e) Tamu – Moreh (India)

For the border to China, we currently still need to apply permission for Entry/Departure at Muse (China). A Friendship Bridge has been opened in May 2015 along the Myanmar-Laos border. This border-point has not yet been designated as International Gateway and still requires a permit for any arrival or departure. There is currently no entry/exit checkpoint along Myanmar-Bangladesh border.

Please contact your sales consultant for further details and up to date information.

Travel in Myanmar

Travel within the country is pretty much unrestricted in the for tourists accessible areas. You may travel freely without being questioned. Some remote areas are however restricted to foreigners and need permission to be arranged a few weeks before arrival.

Some methods of local transport are still powered directly by people such as the trishaw or horses, although there are many places to rent a bicycle if you would prefer that. Taxis and other modes of travel are available for long journeys within Myanmar.

Easia Travel recommends traveling by air, some public buses, riverboat or private vehicle for long distances. Domestic flights are arranged only with Myanmar’s privately owned airlines that are very well regulated. All cars used on tours are air-conditioned (except for some remote rural areas). Other vehicles such as jeeps, vans, coaches and buses are available upon request. There will also be the opportunity for you to charter a ferry and/or a cruise ship.

Buses

Tourist buses in Myanmar are roomy and are air-conditioned making travel on them comfortable. Taking a local non-tourist bus can be a fun experience for a short period but be aware that they tend to be very full, unsafe and uncomfortable. Some VIP night coaches between Yangon-Mandalay, Yangon – Nyaung Shwe (Inle lake) and Bagan – Nyaung Shwe (Inle lake) are very comfortable with reclining seats, good service. Furthermore, the cost of traveling by local bus in Myanmar is very affordable in comparison to flights.

Trains

Myanmar’s railway network comprises 2900 miles of railway track and 550 train stations. Traveling by train in Myanmar can be very enjoyable and scenic, especially if you are a fan of trains. However the ride on trains in Myanmar can be on the other hand very bumpy due to bad but steadily improving rail conditions at times and be prepared for delays caused by any number of reasons.

– The Yangon – Mandalay line has the least problems of staying on schedule of any train.

– The Hsipaw-Mandalay (150 km) is very popular and offers some of the most stunning views ever. (Paul Theroux managed to do this back when foreigners weren’t supposed to, in his book The Great Railway Bazaar).

– Kalaw – Shwe Nyaung (Inle) offers beautiful views over the mountainous landscapes of the Shan State.

– Most of the other lines are slower and are less comfortable and are not desirable to travel on.

Trains that travel long distances have dining cars that are accessible to passengers traveling by first, upper and sleeper class. There is also the opportunity to buy food from vendors on the platforms when the train stops which happens quite frequently.

Cars

This is by far the most convenient and scenic way to travel in Myanmar except walking. The cost of renting a car however might be more expensive than one would think due to a shortage in gasoline and car parts in Myanmar. The cost of renting a car for drive between cities is between $100 and $190 US dollars. Bear in mind that you cannot drive a car in Myanmar and if you do so it could cause some problems with local authorities. Easia Travel can propose a vast array of automobiles available for you to choose from for your drive. These vehicles are in good condition and have air conditioning.

Among the most popular and reliable rental cars in the country are second-hand, reconditioned Toyota Corona hatchbacks imported from Japan from 1988. Cars that are slightly more up to date are Toyota Chasers (from 1990 to 1992).Myanmar also produces its own Mazda jeeps – MJs – 80% local parts. These jeeps are great for off-roading.

Boats

A cruise on the Ayeyarwaddy River is often on the ‘wish list’ of visitors. These range from multi-day luxury cruises to simple one-day trips. Some of the key routes include:

– Mandalay to Bagan – on IWT (Government ferries) or privately-owned boats such as Malikha or RV Shwe Keinnery. Charter boats are also available for rent such as MS Hintha or RV Yandabo.

– Myitkyina to Mandalay via Bhamo – Operated by a number of privately owned speed boasts and IWT ferries.

– Mawlamyine to Hpa-An – Small private boats

– Sittwe to Mrauk U – Small private boats

In addition to river cruising, the southern Mergui Archipelago is an increasingly popular place for cruising with the option of adding scuba diving around the islands.

Luxury Boats

For more affluent travel on newer vessels, some luxury boats operate in the upper and lower regions of the Ayeyarwaddy River. We offer cruises of between one and 14 nights along the river between the cities of Yangon and Mandalay. Please check with your sales consultant about the latest programs.

Dos & Don’ts

When visiting Myanmar, there are some customs and beliefs that travelers should be aware of before coming to the country in order to avoid offending any of the locals.
Here are some helpful hints to keep in mind whilst visiting:
The Rules to follow:

  • When you offer something to a monk, nun, or an elderly person, use both hands. With others, apart from casual transactions at shops or food stalls use your right hand or both hands.
  • Please ask before taking photos of people– particularly monks.
  • Learn a few words of the Myanmar language. It is always greatly appreciated

The Rules to Respect:

  • Never wear shoes and socks inside a pagoda or monastery
  • Visitors should avoid wearing anything alluring in public. In a pagoda, men and women should avoid wearing sleeveless shirts or revealing clothing
  • Do not step over the body of anyone else; but if you must, always ask to be excused first
  • Monks and nuns should not be touched. Women should be careful not to let any part of their body touch a monk’s robes.
  • Do not lose your temper. Furthermore, touching someone older than you on the head may also be interpreted as an act of aggression and should be avoided.
  • Don’t point your feet at anybody or anything. As well, be sure not to sit with your feet pointed at a Buddha image (sit cross-legged or with your legs tucked behind you).
  • Do not accept any kinds of drugs here. Penalties for drug-trafficking range from five years’ imprisonment to a death sentence.
  • Avoid posing or sitting with Buddhist images.
  • Do not show affection in public.
  • Do not give money directly to a monk.
  • Do not step voluntarily on a monk’s shadow
  • For more information: http://www.dosanddontsfortourists.com/

Money & budget

Money
Myanmar’s currency is called the Kyat, pronounced “chat,” and the coins are called pya. Bills that represent Kyat are broken down into 50, 100, 200, 500, 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 Kyat denominations. Please be aware that the Kyat is a non-convertible currency, and cannot officially be exchanged abroad Tourists are able to exchange money (US Dollars, Singapore Dollars, Thai Baht, and Euros) at the current market rate in the airport or at any licensed moneychanger upon presentation of a passport. Please ask your tour guide for assistance. Note: in smaller towns (Kyaing Tong, Monywa, Kyauk Me), currency exchanges may not be open on weekends. ATMs, which distribute kyats, are found throughout the country. However, ATM functionality is not consistent, so we suggest bringing foreign currency for exchange. The Central Bank of Myanmar has withdrawn all foreign currency exchange licenses for businesses, including hotels, restaurants, airlines, and souvenir shops. Since 1 November 2015, US dollars were made illegal to accept. However, some locations and businesses still accept USD as payment despite this law. It is still recommended to exchange your money, as kyats are readily and legally accepted throughout the country
USD
All USD brought into Myanmar must be in pristine condition (new or nearly new bills). Make sure that paper notes are not marked or stamped IN ANY WAY. Pencil marks can be removed, but any permanent marks will adversely impact a note’s value or cause it to be rejected entirely. Do not have any creases or fold lines on the bills either, since this will also decrease a note’s value. Make sure that your bills are current US currency; none of the older variations, such as those depicting smaller images of presidents, will be accepted. If you are carrying 100 USD bills, make sure that their serial numbers do not begin with “CB,” since this will possibly result in the bill’s rejection. 100 USD bills yield the best exchange rate, while smaller denominations are slightly more expensive to exchange.
Euro
The Euro is rarely used in Myanmar, even at major hotels, so visitors traveling with Euros will need to convert their cash to Myanmar Kyats, and it’s easy to exchange Euros into Kyats in major tourist destinations such as Yangon or Mandalay. We suggest exchanging your Euros into Kyats upon arrival in Myanmar, or exchange Euros for USD before you enter the country.

Credit Cards & ATMs
The network of ATMs covers Myanmar’s most visited cities. The maximum amount allowed per withdrawal is 300,000 MMK, and the daily maximum amount you can withdraw is 1,000,000 MMK, subject to the limit set up by the issuing bank. The ATMs charge a small fee of 5,000 MMK, or the equivalent for each transaction. Some Visa cards are restricted by the issuing bank for overseas usage, so guests may need approval from their issuing bank. Credit cards are accepted by a few vendors, which are usually high-end hotels or shops. However, they usually carry a 5-10% surcharge, and do not always work. Please note that the Burmese banking system is still developing, and neither ATMs nor credit cards should be relied upon as the sole source of cash for your holiday. Traveler’s cheques are not accepted in Myanmar.

Traveller Checks
Traveller checks are not accepted in Myanmar.

Foreigner Exchange Certificate (FECS)
These certificates are no longer in use in Myanmar, and were outlawed as of March 2013. Some guidebooks may still carry erroneous information about the validity of FECs.

Bargaining
In Myanmar you are expected to bargain. Do so freely but respectfully. Keep a smile on your face, be realistic about the expected discount and if the vendor does not reach your final price do not push him or her too hard.

Tipping
Tipping is a part of the local culture. It is customary in Burmese culture to offer a small tip for those in the service industry. For suggested amounts:

  • Pre- arranged meals: 0.50 – 1US$ per pax per meal
  • Meal on client’s own account: 5% of the bill if not already included
  • Housekeeping: 1US$ per room
  • Porter at Hotel and Airport: 0.50 US$ per luggage
  • Vehicles Driver: 2-3 US$ per pax per day
  • Station Guide: 3US$ per pax per day
  • Throughout Guide: 5 US$ per pax per day
  • Trekking Guide: 5US$ per staff

Health

If you travel to Myanmar prepared your chances of becoming ill are very low. Make sure that you have that all of your vaccinations are current and that you are vaccinated for Tetanus, Polio and Diphtheria. Other vaccines recommended include Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B (if you are in-country for over 3 months), Typhus and Tuberculosis, vaccinations against rabies and Japanese encephalitis are also advised. Officially there are no vaccinations required to enter Myanmar. However, any travels from West Africa, Central Africa, Central America or South America need to present vaccinations records against Yellow Fever upon arrival but this is often overlooked by the authorities.
Please be advised that the medical infrastructure in Myanmar is still quite limited, and therefore we usually recommend that guests travel to Bangkok or Singapore (located quite close to Myanmar) in case of grave illness or serious injury. It is for this reason that we advise all guests to obtain comprehensive medical insurance, including on-site medical and repatriation expenses, in particular. Please also be aware that hospitals do request a guarantee that their costs will be covered. Without insurance, emergency services must be paid for immediately and in cash (USD), and are often very expensive. However, comprehensive medical insurance coverage will cover the costs directly, avoiding any immediate and expensive cash payments. Please rest assured that we will always assist our on-the-spot travelers to the best of our abilities in case of required medical intervention. While traveling upcountry, we will always send an agent from the office to help the guests communicate with the doctors.

  •  Yangon, Mandalay and Bagan: there are good hospitals in Myanmar’s major cities (Yangon, Mandalay, and Bagan), whose teams are composed of international doctors: Parami Hospital, Victoria Hospital, Asia Royal, and Global Care Bagan International Clinic.
  • Inle Lake and Loikaw: in Inle lake and Loikaw, there are only local doctors. However, 2 hours away from Inle Lake (in Taungyi), there is a hospital, should the situation be serious.
  • Ngapali: in Ngapali, almost all hotels have a doctor on-call, and there is a small clinic, managed by the French AMFA, but its services are quite basic.

Emergency contacts

Your home embassy may be able to assist with advice during emergencies or serious problems. You might want to register if possible before you arrive so that the embassy staff will know where to reach you in case of emergency at home. If calling a Myanmar emergency number you may have to ask the aid of a Burmese speaker because there might not be an English-speaking operator on the line:
Ambulance: 192
Fire department: 191
Police: 199
Red Cross: (01) 392029 / 30

What to prepare?

Pre-departure Tasks
Make sure your passport is valid with at least 6 months before the expiry date and that you have the correct visas. Have a look at the visa requirements for more information.
Consider medical, baggage and trip cancellation insurances.
Check with your doctor re vaccinations and medicines needed.

Clothes

  • Clothing should be lightweight and of the drip dry variety. You will be in the sun a lot so long sleeves and a wide hat would be more suitable.
  • Underwear should be synthetic and easily washable.
  • Sleepwear.
  • Shirts should be long sleeved and light weight with lots of closed pockets.
  • T-shirts, short sleeved and again with pockets.
  • Cool evenings necessitate the need for pullovers or a light weight jacket.
  • A light weight vest with lots of pockets will be handy for carrying your film camera and binoculars.
  • Long trousers made from a lightweight, quick drying fabric should have multi pockets for day trips. Long trousers that turn into shorts are ideal.
  • For trekking lightweight long shorts (for modesty purposes) are acceptable.
  • Bathing suit should be modest so as not to offend the locals.
  • Hat for protection from the sun. Should have a wide brim and a strap.
  •  A sturdy poncho or parka will help to keep you gear dry in case of rain or waterfall spray.
  • Footwear: You will need some sturdy comfortable boots for trekking or just walking around.
  • They will need to support your ankle as well as having a non slip sole.
  • Water proof sandals for those short trips and boating.
  • Some smart casual clothes for the evenings and visiting restaurants.
  • Evenings in the hill stations and on Inle Lake can be quite chilly so bring a sweater or other warm clothing if visiting these areas. This applies especially for the winter months November-February for treks and the Inle lake area where early morning boat rides can be quite cold. Visitors should not wear shorts, short skirts or other skimpy clothing when visiting pagodas and monasteries.

Pharmacy

  • Insect repellent with the percentage of DEET recommended by your travel medicine physician. It’s important that you bring an ample supply of good quality repellent.
  • Antiseptic wipes for hand washing and emergency toilet paper.
  • Personal First Aid Kit (bring in small amounts and in small containers)
  • Aspirin/ibuprofen, etc.
  • Cold-symptom relief tablets, antihistamine, cough drops. Adequate quantity of sweat-resistant sun screen with at least an SPF 15 rating or higher, and lip balm with sunscreen.
  • Antibiotics.
  • Prescription medicines in their original bottles. Acidophilus enzyme (available in capsules in health-food stores). This often helps your digestive system get in shape for “new” flora.
  • Immodium, Lomotil, or similar anti-diarrhea medicine. Pepto-Bismol tablets and/or liquid (in leak-proof bottle).

Vaccinations
If you travel to Myanmar prepared your chances of becoming ill are very low. Make sure that you have that all of your vaccinations are current and that you are vaccinated for Tetanus, Polio and Diphtheria. Other vaccines recommended include Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B (if you are in-country for over 3 months), Typhus and Tuberculosis, vaccinations against rabies and Japanese encephalitis are also advised. Officially there are no vaccinations required to enter Myanmar. However, any travels from West Africa, Central Africa, Central America or South America need to present vaccinations records against Yellow Fever upon arrival but this is often overlooked by the authorities.

Manaw Festival

10 January

Kachin State, Myanmar

In this important, quite large event, almost all the different clans of the Kachin Race gather in Myitkyinato to rejoice at the Manaw Festival. Originally, this festival was rooted in animist beliefs to show gratitude to ancestral spirits and pray for a bright future. Usually held on the 10th of January on Kachin State Days, today, the festival is a simple celebration of the New Year, the reunion of tribes, and victory in battle. Everyone attends this festival wearing his or her best traditional costumes.

Manaw Festival

Ananda Temple Festival

13 - 28 January

Bagan, Myanamar

One of the biggest events on the Bagan Calendar, the Ananda Temple Festival features a huge variety of dances, songs, and even the incredible, fascinating story of Anyeints: A theatrical performance which lasts for several hours, and provides a fabulous mix of comedy with traditional puppetry. About four or five days before the full moon, caravans from villages around Bagan make their way to the festival, camping around Ananda Temple for about a week, making the area look (and feel) just like a country fair.

Ananda Temple Festival

Naga New Year's Festival

14 - 15 January

Sagaing, Myanmar

Hidden deep in northwestern Myanmar, in the vicinity of Chin Hills, Nar-ga villages are spread around small towns of Lahe, Layshi, Hkamti and Nanyun. So far, the area is very remote and quite difficult to access -and that’s what inspires curious adventurers of the world.The Nar-ga New Year Festival takes place annually from the 14th to 15th of January, and is essentially a ceremony of thanks to Mother Earth for a bountiful harvest, and the time, once in the whole year, when different tribes meet to sing, dance and feast together.

Naga New Year's Festival

Kyaik Khauk Pagoda Festival

12 - 19 February

Thanlyin (Syriam), Myanmar

Located at Kyaik Khauk Pagoda, the atmosphere of the Golden Hilltop Festival is remarkably similar to a festive fun fair. Visitors will delight at a large variety of stalls that offer delicious local cuisine, clay pots, furniture, and bamboo mats. Performances take place well into the night, and villagers travel from all around by ox-carts to join in the fun and excitement of this fantastically colorful festival.

Kyaik Khauk Pagoda Festival

Tabodwe Happenings

17 - 19 February

Nationwide, Myanmar

Tabodwe is the 11th month in Myanmar’s Lunar Calendar – a month of new harvests throughout the country. During this month, all over Myanmar, a savory snack made from glutinous rice called “Htamane” is prepared in abundance – it serves as an offering of new harvest to pagodas and monks, to friends and neighbors, and to gain merit in the Buddhist sense. Htamane feasts in some parts of the country are held as a form of friendly competition.

Tabodwe Happenings

Nyan Taw Pagoda Festival

17 - 19 February

Pyin Oo Lwin, Myanmar

Like most pagoda festivals in Myanmar, the Nyantaw Pagoda Festival features all the Burmese colors and livelihood, along with beautiful song and dance, that makes these incredible, pagoda-side events so entrancing. During this time, many Shan people and other hill tribes come down to sell their products to the revelers.

Nyan Taw Pagoda Festival

Mahamuni Pagoda Festival

17 - 19 February

Mandalay, Myanmar

This colorful festival generally lasts for two weeks, with the renowned image of Mahamuni Buddha at the center of the activities. Many devout Buddhists from around the country make pilgrimage to Mandalay for this festival, who burn incense sticks to commemorate Buddha. A variety of local shops and food stalls are set up, especially in the evening and at night, where visitors and devotees can see a number of authentic local plays, dances and songs.

Mahamuni Pagoda Festival

Pindaya Cave Festival

16 - 20 March

Pindaya, Myanmar

Throughout the festival at the Pindaya Caves, thousands of pilgrims come to worship at the pagoda. Here, hundreds of small stalls line the entrance of the pagoda, chock full of local foods, handicrafts, Burmese cigars and much more. Shan tribes also parade their fantastically colorful costumes, making for a great traditional element to appreciate.

Pindaya Cave Festival

Indawgyi Pagoda Festival

13 - 20 March

Hopin (near Myitkina), Myanmar

The Indawgyi Festival takes place approximately 160 kilometers from Myitkyina and lasts for 8 days. The pagoda festival held here in February or March attracts more than 100,000 devotees from the surrounding areas, and at this time of year, towards the end of the dry season, the water level is low enough that one can walk across to the pagoda from the mainland on a wooden walkway, with two walkways actually constructed.

Indawgyi Pagoda Festival

Bawgyo Pagoda Festival

15 - 20 March

Shan State (near Hsipaw), Myanmar

Once a year, the “Four Images of Buddha”, usually locked away, are displayed for the public to worship. Gilded with gold leaf, many Buddhists come from around the country to witness these incredibly holy images. Villagers from Palaung and the many hill tribes scattered around the area come here to sell their tea, jewelry and various other hand-made products, as well, making for a very diverse group of devotees, vendors, and visitors.

Bawgyo Pagoda Festival

Nawin Taung Pagoda Festival

20 March

Pyin Oo Lwin, Myanmar

A traditional Shan festival, in the north of Pyin Oo Lwin, this event is defined by the stalls and vendors selling practically every possible product imaginable and the traditional ethnic performances.

Nawin Taung Pagoda Festival

Shwedagon Pagoda Festival

20 March

Yangon, Myanmar

The Shwedagon Pagoda Festival is mostly celebrated on the full moon day of Tabaung in February and/or March, depending on the Lunar Calendar. This festival is for the enjoyment of all citizens, from every country in Myanmar, who bring water, light, and flowers to the seemingly- endless images of Buddha. The day concludes with people praying and worshiping Buddha, all in their own time and ways.

Shwedagon Pagoda Festival

Shwe Saryan Pagoda Festival

20 March - 01 April

Near Mandalay, Myanmar

This lively festival features live performances of traditional song and dance, and, as with many (if not all) Burmese festivals, many locals come out to sell their products. One of the best-selling products in this region is a traditional toy, made of dried toddy palm leaves. Be sure to pick one up!

Shwe Saryan Pagoda Festival

Shwemawdaw Pagoda Festival

12 - 19 April

Bago, Myanmar

Exuding the vibrancy and life that the other Burmese pagoda festivals bring forth, this evening’s entertainment includes Zats, Anyeints, stage shows, and fairs selling all kinds of treats and goodies.

Shwemawdaw Pagoda Festival

Thingyan Water Festival

13 - 16 April

Nationwide, Myanmar

Similar to Thailand’s Songkran Festival, the Burmese New Year is celebrated in April, and everyone has a great time washing the sins and negativity of the past year away. While the young and young at heart head out to the douse each other with water, the older take retreat in pagodas and monasteries to perform meritorious deeds. This is the time of year when it’s very difficult to stay dry-everyone throws water at everyone, but it’s certainly refreshing and fun to play into it!

Thingyan Water Festival

Popa Ceremony

17 - 23 April

Mt. Popa, Myanmar

Mt. Popa is one of the most sacred religious sites in Myanmar and home to a prominent Nat (spirit) worship center. During this festival, various Natdances on Mt Popa can make it quite crowded, and accessing the mountain at this time of year can prove to be somewhat difficult. However, travelers to this annual event will find a cultural gem unlike any other one that will never be forgotten.

Popa Ceremony

Chin-Lone Festival

03 - 17 June

Mandalay, Myanmar

The main attraction of this fascinating festival is the Chin Lone (Cane Ball) tournament, which takes place in the Mahamuni Pagoda and can last for weeks, even months. Local Cane ball players make their way from all over the country, and teams from other countries even take part in this incredible competition and display of athleticism.

Chin-Lone Festival

Thi-Ho-Shin Pagoda Festival

10 - 17 June

Pakokku, Myanmar

This lively and charming little festival and market is held around Ho-Shin Pagoda, where travelers can find entertainment like Zats, Anyeints and even movies.

Thi-Ho-Shin Pagoda Festival

Shwe Kyun Pin Nat Festival

01 - 05 August

Mingun, Myanmar

This festival takes place in the Burmese month of Wagaung. Farmers decked out in colorful dresses and accompanied by amazing bullock carts ride alongside traditional performances and crafts, including several kinds of ceramics from Sagaing and Kyauk Myaung, displayed on the riverbanks.

Shwe Kyun Pin Nat Festival

Taung Byone Nat Festival

08 - 15 August

Taung Byone, Myanmar

The festival is celebrated to honor the two powerful spirit brothers of Bagan Era, named Taung Byone Min Nyi Naung. This festival is also said to provide a prominent and effective gathering spot for mediums to contact spirits. One of the most exciting, vibrant, and spiritually important festivals for Nat worshippers in the country, this festival comes complete with stunning dances and traditional performances.

Taung Byone Nat Festival

Yadana Gu Nat Festival

23 - 29 August

Mandalay, Myanmar

This Nat-centric celebration has actually become famous because of the enjoyable rowing trip to the site itself. The festival is held in honor of Mewanna, the mother of the Taung Byone Nat brothers, and the Goddess of Popa, a powerful spirit and protector of women, whose main shrine is on Popa Crest, near Bagan. Nat worshippers celebrate this festival for the Mother who returned from Taung Byone Festival on her way to Mount Popa, while stopping at Yadanagu along the way.

Yadana Gu Nat Festival

Boe Boe Gyi Nat Festival

16 September

Mandalay, Myanmar

The Boe Boe Gyi Nat Festival is held to celebrate the fabled alchemist Boe Boe Gyi, who is now worshipped as a Nat. Near Taungthaman Lake, pilgrims at the ceremony throw packets of tea leafs at one another, and those who are hit by the packets must visit the following year without fail!

Boe Boe Gyi Nat Festival

Shwekyetyet Pagoda Festival

20 - 21 September

Mandalay, Myanmar

This festival is celebrated at the Shwekyetyet Pagoda right on the banks of Ayeyarwaddy River. Like other Myanmar pagoda festivals, shops, food stalls, music, and songs flood the streets as merry revelers arrive at the festival. On some occasions, if there has been minimal to no flooding, rowboat competitions are also held.

Shwekyetyet Pagoda Festival

Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda Festival

29 September - 16 October

Inle Lake, Myanmar

Those who attend the Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda Festival will marvel at the procession of leg-rowed boats, which, in true ceremonial fashion, drag four giant statues of Buddha on a barge across the picturesque Inle Lake–truly a spectacular sight to behold. All throughout the festival, leg-rowed boat races take place on the lake, and hundreds of other vessels bobbing about in the water add to the festive, vibrant environment.

Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda Festival

Elephant Dance Festival

03 - 05 October

Mandalay, Myanmar

Situated in a small town not far from Mandalay, an exotic “dummy elephant” dance festival takes place at KyaukSe. Locals construct a huge, yet comparatively feather-light elephant from paper and bamboo, while other men take their places inside the float and dance around the town to the beat of the Dobat and drums.

Elephant Dance Festival

Kyauktawgyi Pagoda Festival

06 - 13 October

Mandalay, Myanmar

The color and excitement is quite similar to most other pagoda festivals that take place in Myanmar, and there are truly no shortage of these vibrant and authentic types of celebration that take place all over the country in one form or another.

Kyauktawgyi Pagoda Festival

Thadingyut Festival

11 - 13 October

Nationwide, Myanmar

Thadingyut, or the Festival of Lights, marks the end of the Buddhist Lent, and is also one of the most prominent and important festivals of the year. Thadingyut is not only for joyous celebration, but also thanksgiving and paying respects to Buddhist monks, teachers, parents, and elders, as well as asking pardon for whatever misdeeds might have committed in the past.

Thadingyut Festival

Shwe Kyin Floating Light Festival

14 October

Shwe Kyin, Myanmar

Annually, after the full moon day of Thadingyut, the Shwe Kyin Floating Light festival is celebrated by a creek, near a small town in Shwe Kyin, near Bago. This festival is truly like experiencing a moment of authentic, traditional history, preserved in living time. Rowing races dominate the day, but the highlight of the festival occurs only after darkness falls, when locals launch hundreds of lit candles on floating paper boats onto the water.

Shwe Kyin Floating Light Festival

Indein Pagoda Festival

20 - 21 October

Inle Lake, Myanmar

The Indein Pagoda Festival is a prominent Buddhist ceremony that takes place at this fascinating and beautiful site – the aged shrine complex by Inle Lake. The tranquility of the lake and even the pagoda itself, to say nothing of the festival’s rituals, will certainly enchant.

Indein Pagoda Festival

Kaung-Hmu-Daw Pagoda Festival

04 - 11 November

Saigaing, Myanmar

This decidedly authentic and quite traditional festival features a number of bullock carts, which carry products and produce from the surrounding hill tribes, who’ve come to sell their wares. Another festival of vibrancy and color courtesy of the fantastic products of the local people, this celebration features a number of stalls selling beautiful, hand-woven cotton, clothes and cane mats.

Kaung-Hmu-Daw Pagoda Festival

Balloon Festival

05 - 12 November

Taunggyi, Myanmar

One of the most famous of the festivals in all of Myanmar is doubtlessly the Balloon Festival in Taunggyi. This bombastic festival features fireworks, along with a hot air balloon contest which starts in the day and lasts well into the night. During the day, onlookers can marvel at balloons in the shape of pagodas, while at night, they bring out balloons that resemble picturesque lanterns that light up the night sky.

Balloon Festival

Shwezigon Festival

06 -13 November

Bagan, Myanmar

Like many of the Buddhist pagoda festivals across the country, the Shwezigon Festival features all the color, life and vibrancy that one would come to expect from learning about these numerous and diverse celebrations. Zats plays a prominent role in the festivities, and the festivities feature a number of dances and songs, as well as full-fledged plays.

Shwezigon Festival

Tazaungdaing Light Festival

09 - 11 November

Nationwide, Myanmar

The Tazaungdaing Light Festival is held throughout the country before and on the full moon day of lunar month Tazaungmone. Streets are filled with lights, and Buddhists dress in full robes at Ka-htain. On this day, a staggering total of 9,999 candles are lit at midnight, and revelers enjoy mixed salads, consisting of Maezali buds, which believed to possess magical and powerful properties when eaten at this time.

Tazaungdaing Light Festival

Shin Mar Le Pagoda Festival

10 - 11 November

Thazi, Myanmar

This unique festival takes place at the time of the Ta-Zaung Dine Festival, where people throw lotus flowers from the top of a giant stupa at Mahamuni Pagoda. Visitors come to pay homage to the Lord Buddha.

Shin Mar Le Pagoda Festival

Kyaikhtiyo Pagoda Festival

11 November

Golden Tock, Myanmar

This festival takes place at arguably the most spectacular and breathtaking location in the entire country. The Kyaikhityo Pagoda Festival is held the site where a massive boulder hangs delicately over the edge of a peak. Pilgrims travel from all over the country to witness the full moon and 9,999 candles lit at midnight in this absolutely stunning and almost otherworldly experience.

Kyaikhtiyo Pagoda Festival

Moenyin Thanboddhay Pagoda Festival

10 - 11 November

Monywa, Myanmar

This is yet another fantastic pagoda festival that is truly unique to Myanmar. Color and excitement take over Monywa, and a number of plays, songs and traditional dance take the day and night to exciting heights. Of course, vendors will arrive, some with beautiful, locally produced items like local thanaka, sandalwood, and vibrant textiles.

Moenyin Thanboddhay Pagoda Festival

Phowintaung Pagoda Festival

10 - 11 November

Sagaing, Myanmar

Like other pagoda festivals, with the usual vendors and vibrant, Burmese color palate, visitors can also find Myanmar’s thanaka, sandalwood and woven textiles (cotton blankets and longyis mainly) around the pagoda area, much like during the Moenyin Thanboddhay Pagoda Ceremony.

Phowintaung Pagoda Festival

Robe Weaving Contest

10 - 11 November

Nationwide, Myanmar

The Robe Weaving Contest is a massive, country-wide celebration, and takes place prior to the full moon. The contest decides which team of women has and can demonstrate the best weaving skills. The robes they weave, called “Ma Tho Thin Gan”, are a rich saffron color and truly show dedication and skill.

Robe Weaving Contest

Victoire Chapuis

Sales Manager- Incentive/MICE

I am Victoire, joining Myanmar team as MICE Manager!

I studied law but my path lead me to event, I worked for 3 years for a company named Auditoire in France, maybe some of you heard about it? Now I am joining the tourism sector and Easia big family, i am looking forward to discover this new area!

If you ask my friends they would tell you that I’m very optimistic, funny, joyful and careful, maybe sometimes a bit stubborn as well.

My coworkers would say that I’m passionate, organized and very curious.

Phyu Phyu Tun

Easia ACTIVE Sales Executive

My name is Phyu and I hail from the last royal capital city in Myanmar, Mandalay. Since my childhood, I’ve always been passionate about adventure travel.

I love the challenge of customizing flawless vacations for my clients. I want my clients to discover something about themselves they didn’t know before they started their travels.

When they come back looking ten years younger, I know I did a good job!

Lucas Pagel de Souza

Sales Development Manager - Spain & Portugal

I was born in Brazil, grew up in the US in the Boston area and lived in Germany for 10 years. Since 2017, it is in Yangon that I have found my new home. From its culture and people to the country’s mesmerizing sceneries, Myanmar never seizes to amaze me.

My story with Easia Travel and Myanmar started back in 2014 when I came to work at the company as an intern. After returning to Germany to finish my studies, it didn’t take me long to realize that my story with Easia had only begun, and so in 2017 I returned as the Sales Development Manager for the Spanish and Portuguese markets.

Overall, life never gets boring here! There is always something new to see, learn and do. On my free time, I like to explore Yangon and it’s surroundings, taking longer trips to discover new and exciting places when time allows. My absolutely favorite place that I’ve visited so far in the country has been Hpa An, a picturesque region where you can enjoy long motorbike rides through the countryside, explore caves and go on canoe rides through fascinating landscapes.

 

Ei Thinzar Maw

Sales Executive - German market

I was born in Kyauktan township-Thanlyin city. This town is located south of Yangon and the one major international port and trading center of Yangon. It has Kyaik Hmaw Win Ye Le Pagoda and it lies in the peninsula. So it can be reached only by boat and I love my native town.
I joined the Easia team in 2015.
I like travelling and unforgettable place is Inle Lake in Myanmar. It is natural lake and can see this lake around shan hills. In villages and towns across the lake, wooden houses are built high on stilts and fishermen steer their one-man boats with a unique rowing style, beautiful floating gardens produce delicious vegetables and flowers. Along with fishing and farming, traditional handicrafts are an important part of the local economy for the people.
If I have a chance, I want to visit Bhutan. I hear that this place is the Land of the Thunder Dragon. It has breathtaking scenery and unique culture.
I spend my precious time watching the movies and reading the book. That why I can get the knowledge of different culture, languages and see the beautiful landscape.

Thandar Khin Oo

Sales Executive - German market

I was born Yangon, in Myanmar. I love my city with my warm atmosphere and my nice environment. Yangon is the city of Myanmar where most of businesses are located and developed. It is also very good in all transportations and trading. I have joined Easia in January 2017. One of my most memorable trips was Kyaikhtiyo in 2016 with my family. It like this landscapes, amazing location with golden shining pagoda and wonderful sunset from mountain. One of my top wishes to travel is Taunggyi. I love this nice weather and like their traditional Shan foods.
I like shopping, watching movie, eating some traditional foods which are spicy and hot, hangout with my family on my holidays.

Zin Mya Thaw

Sales Executive – German GIT Market

I was born and grew up in Yangon, Myanmar which is a Southeast Asian nation. In my city, I like the most cup of tea and tea leaf salad for food, Pathein umbrella for accessory and traditional longyi for dress. I joined Easia Travel family since 17 March 2014. My most memorable trip was motivation trip to Pyin Oo Lwin with our Easia Myanmar family in July 2016. This city is also known as flower city which was located in the Shan Highland, some 67 kilometers east of Mandalay. Before we know where our motivation trip is, we had some brain storming games to describe the place. We could rebuild our team spirit and team work doing games group by group in contest after we have been fighting during high season for our clients. Whatever we got the prize in contest, we had a lot of funny during this trip and we got understanding each other than before. Moreover, we all were ready and had enough energy for upcoming season. Next trip on my list with my parents is Bodh Gaya, Indian. For Buddhists, Bodh Gaya is the most important of the main four pilgrimage sites related to the life of Gautama Buddha, the other three being Kushinagar, Lumbini, and Sarnath. Apart from working and travelling, I would spend my time by cooking delicious curry for family, caring my small garden, reading books and watching movies.

Celia Hulin

Product Manager

When I am home, in Belgium, I like going for a run in the forests around Liege, my hometown. The best moment is autumn, when the trees display all shades of orange and brown and the weather is cold enough to enjoy the fresh air. The cold is something I haven’t enjoyed in a while since I have come back to Yangon office in June 2016. My first day at Easia goes back to April 2015 though, when I was still an intern. I have had the opportunity to extensively travel around Myanmar as Jr. Product Manager, but my favorite experience was probably in M Rauk U, at Koe-Thaung Temple to be more precise. I remember being overwhelmed by the strange feeling of being the first person to explore this mesmerizing temple – the Indiana Jones kind of experience! I obviously wasn’t, but the area being deserted, I delved into the spiritual and historical atmosphere even deeper. Living abroad and working for tourism only make your travel bucket list longer every day! But if I had to choose one destination, it would probably be Lapland for the northern lights and the cold…did I mention how I love the cold?!